February 2024

February2024

Inside the Februrary Issue

 

 

Working Around Live
Electricity Is a Serious Hazard

Working with electricity or electrical equipment poses hazards every day in the workplace. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, electricity accounted for nearly 4,000 job-related injuries in the U.S. in 2019 and an additional 166 deaths.

Many workers are unaware of the potential electrical hazards in their work environment, which only increases their risks. Engineers, electricians, construction workers, and other professionals work directly with or near electricity, such as overhead power lines, cable harnesses, and circuit assemblies. Others, such as factory, office, and retail workers, are often exposed indirectly to electrical hazards through faulty equipment or over-burdened extension cords. Accidental contact with electrical currents can cause electric shock, electrocution, fires, and explosions.

Generators
Generators are commonly used as a replacement source of electricity when electrical power is lost. Most generators are gasoline or diesel powered with internal combustion engines which turn an alternator to produce electricity. One of the hazards from gasoline or diesel-powered engines is carbon monoxide (CO). Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced during the operation of gasoline powered generators. When inhaled, the gas reduces your ability to transport oxygen. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, nausea and fatigue that can lead to unconsciousness and ultimately prove fatal. The following information is a list of best practices to identify hazards when operating around power lines and electrical equipment.

•DO NOT operate a generator indoors. Generators should be placed outdoors in a location where the exhaust gases cannot enter a home or building. Good ventilation is key to operating a generator safely.
•Be sure the main circuit breaker is OFF and locked out prior to starting any generator. This will prevent inadvertent energization of power lines from back feed electrical energy from generators and help protect utility line workers from electrocution.
•Turn off generators and let them cool prior to refueling.

Electrical Equipment
Due to the dynamic, rugged nature of construction work, normal use of electrical equipment causes wear and tear that results in insulation breaks, short-circuits, and exposed
wires. If there is no ground-fault protection, it can cause a ground-fault that sends current through a worker’s body. Full story »

 

today's News

Florida Buildings Engineering & Facility Maintenance Show 2024: Free, Larger

FSM Staff | 02.22.24

TAMPA, FL -- Pat Hoey Productions announced the return of the Florida Buildings Engineering & Facility Maintenance Show, which is expected to surpass its record attendance of over 400 facilities managers from 2023. This premier event is scheduled for April 17, 2024.

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Win a Spot at RIDGID Experience

FSM Staff | 02.22.24

ELYRIA, OH -- Don’t miss your chance to enter to win a spot at the 2024 RIDGID Experience, being held July 31 to August 2 at RIDGID global headquarters in Elyria, Ohio.

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Trane Fort Smith Plant Recognized for Significant Safety Achievement

FSM Staff | 02.22.24

FORT SMITH, AR --Trane − by Trane Technologies celebrated a significant safety milestone at its Commercial HVAC manufacturing facility in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

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National Ladder Safety Month is Coming

FSM Staff | 02.21.24

CLEVELAND, OH -- National Ladder Safety Month is observed next month, as it is every March. Begun by the American Ladder Safety Institute (ALI), the event raises awareness about ladder safety and encourages employers and their workers to engage in annual ladder safety training.

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A Message Worth Repeating: Take Action to Prevent Repetitive Strain Injuries

FSM Staff | 02.21.24

HAMILTON, ON -- On International Repetitive Strain Injury Awareness (RSI) Day, February 29, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) is reminding workplaces to take action to prevent one of the leading causes of workplace injuries in Canada.

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